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The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network - Homepage
The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network is a collaborative effort involving more than 1100 scientists and students investigating ecological processes over long temporal and broad spatial scales. The studies include topics such as hydrology, metabolic rate of ecosystems, global change research, and climate data. Currently there are 24 LTER sites located in various ecosystems across the globe, from Antarctica to Alaska. This project is supported by the National Science Foundation and involves research sites in 21 countries. Within the LTER links provide an opportunity to learn more about international ecological research programs and ecological programs for schoolchildren. Documenting long term ecosystem studies aids in the recognition and control of ecological problems. Project areas include: primary ecosystem production, variations in trophic structures, accumulation and decomposition of organic matter, soil nutrient movement, groundwater and surface water movement, as well as documentation of overall ecological disturbances. This resource is part of the Biocomplexity collection. http://serc.carleton.edu/biocomplexity/
Intended for grade levels:
  • High (9-12)
  • College (13-14)
  • College (15-16)
  • Graduate / Professional
  • General public
Type of resource:
  • Text:
    • Abstract / Summary
    • Report
  • Portal:
    • Educational
  • Dataset:
    • In-situ
Subject:
  • Atmospheric science
  • Biology
  • Climatology
  • Ecology
  • Environmental science
  • Forestry
  • Hydrology
Technical requirements:
No specific technical requirements, just a browser required
Cost / Copyright:
No cost
Copyright 2001 Long Term Ecological Research Network
DLESE Catalog ID: SERC-NAGT-000-000-000-250
Resource contact / Creator / Publisher:
Publisher: Long Term Ecological Research Network
http://www.lternet.edu